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Balancing process against price

Discussion in 'Beginners Airbrush Questions!' started by Neural, Jun 19, 2017.


  1. Neural

    Neural Young Tutorling

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    Starting here because..well, it's been nearly 30 years since I've done aibrush.

    What I want to do:
    Primary goal: Ground aluminum art pieces colored with "candy" paint.
    Secondary goal: Not spend every dollar I have doing so.

    What I have on hand:
    -2' x 2' sheet of Lowe's Hardware Aisle Aluminum
    -4.5" angle grinder
    -a can or two of Dupli-color paint that claims to be candy

    What I would *like* to know more about:

    - An airbrush similar or better in quality than the VST I originally learned on. I am hoping that after 30 years that technology has improved and that what I learned on is now surpassed by the low end products, but I'll be interested in knowing. I prefer dual action, but being that I'm going to work in the 24" range having the ability to change nozzles to cover varying sizes of paint would be helpful.
    -A mobile compressor that will do the job well. I have a "pancake" Hitachi compressor in storage, but where I am able to work, and where I would be able to keep it is a problem. (more on that below). So a small compressor of good quality that can easily be moved and doesn't take up much space is not a huge issue, but I know nothing of what is available today.
    -I've watched a number of videos, and my head is now swimming with names and numbers of all the various chemicals needed to do things like clean the aluminum to prep for paint. clear coats that apparently help paint stick. clear coats that go between paint color coats. Sealants. Polishes, etc. Ultimately, I'd prefer to use things that will work for the specific application I have in mind (meaning working with ground aluminum and candy paints).
    -Safety. If I need one type of mask for grinding aluminum, and another for spraying the paints, etc., I'd like to know the best options there.
    -How to deal with temperatures above 80F (reason below).

    The "below" part:
    Due to my current living situation, my current work space is..outside on the back porch. This is fine by me, as it's good ventilation, and I love being outside.
    The downside is ...I live in Las Vegas. It is currently 7:14pm, and 112F outside. Last night at 2:30am, it was 90F. Most of you who are familiar with painting will note that this is moderately above the suggested operational range of paint use.
    Is there anything at all I can do to overcome this? I don't mind turning on the lights and painting at 2am (it shouldn't be 90F all the time), so long as the air compressor is quiet, but it's kind of difficult to escape the heat here.

    and yes.. I tend to be verbose. :(

    I don't expect a long highly detailed response (not that I'd turn it down), but if people do know of guides or tutorials that will help, I'll take that route (though I'm sure I'll be back asking questions to make sure I understand what I've learned).

    Thanks!
  2. Mr.Micron

    Mr.Micron Royal pain in the air hose Admin

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    First other then clear caoting you can do it all with Water base paint ?? Yes you heard right Createx now makes a true candy paint called CandyO2 which you can pick up at most hobby lobby store and make sure to use their 40% off coupon.. you will also need their inter coat clear (they carry that too)
    If you plan on using more then one color of candy you will want some transparent base to lock out color bleed unless that is the effect your going for.
    Then other then a filter mask you can paint in your garage (if it has AC) some folks even set up a space in their houses to paint . Now other then the grinding part which I guess you could do in you house but why everything else can be done indoors . But as with any paint prep work on the metal is the main key to having a lasting paint job .
    Neural likes this.
  3. JonasCalhoun

    JonasCalhoun Young Tutorling

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    And for the compressors: there are nearly silent compressors on the market that would allow you to paint any time day or night and nobody would be the wiser. Sparmax is a large maker, and then other companies rebrand some of those--but look at Iwata and Badger for two.

    Then you can still paint inside, as Mr. Micron said, but I'd get a good NIOSH approved paint respirator, and also have some sort of a filter and fan to at least let the particulate collect out of the air.


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  4. Mr.Micron

    Mr.Micron Royal pain in the air hose Admin

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  5. Squishy

    Squishy Queen Clown Slayer Mod

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    I def recommend going the water based route. I don't know what your laws are, but seems things are tightening up all over, so probs best to start as you mean to go on. Besides that stuff is nasty and you don't want it around your home and family etc - something to really consider when it comes to clear coat, that stuff is super nasty.

    I use the createx Candy20, its a proper aniline dye candy, and looks awesome.

    At the size you're planning, I would consider a mini hvlp to lay down the candy. I think it will be easier for you to get an even coverage without looking patchy, or have banding. Then switch to airbrush for any artwork.

    As for airbrush if you want to use it for the candy, I suggest a .5 or above. Check out the Iwata eclipse. Its an awesome and versatile brush, it comes with a .35 nozzle, but you can buy a .5 set up for it (needle, nozzle and head) The .35 will give you real fine lines, but has the advantage over dedicated detail brushes of covering larger areas, extended even more with the .5, which also copes better with effects paints. The hobby lobby 40% off voucher for the win again.

    If you go the Createx route there is an additive called 4020, which helps flow in extreme temps, which reminds me you will also need to get the 4030 (an absolute must with the candy20, and use more than recommended, I have best results 1:1).

    Reducer is the 4012, and I recommend a little pf this as it helps with the cure. However, it also helps with drying, which in your temps could cause issues - hopefully the 4020 will keep it flowing. You will have to mess about with mixes and ratios and see what suits you :)
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  6. Neural

    Neural Young Tutorling

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    Thanks for all the info. :)

    I had read/heard about the Candy2o being water based, but does that include the 4020, 4030, and 4012? And does *all* that get mixed in with the color? (seems like a lot, but I don't fully understand paints yet).

    I *may* have space in the garage to work, but it's a 3 car garage that has 1 slot divided off by a wall. I could potentially work in there, but due to half of it being used for storage, the amount of air space is a concern (definitely would want a respirator, even if working with some sort of non-toxic and safe product, as particles, no matter how safe, still get the sinuses clogged up). I believe there is a small 12" x 8" side vent on the floor in the corner, so I might be able to force air outside through that. Unfortunately I'm not the owner of the house, so modifications that are permanent are not going to be an option, but again, I'll see what I *can* do and work from there.

    Temperature-wise I'd still be working in the 90F to 100F range as the garage doesn't have much insulation at all. As a side note there, doing the paint in the house is impossible simply due to lack of space.

    I was looking at the Iwata Eclipse just yesterday. It seems pretty versatile.

    I have a Hobby Lobby not to far from me, so that will be good, especially with that coupon.

    Oh, and if I were to use an even moderate coat (example: using Candy20 red and laying down enough paint to have the metal be red, not pink, but not super deep either), how much space am I looking at being able to cover per ounce of paint?
  7. Mr.Micron

    Mr.Micron Royal pain in the air hose Admin

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    On 2'x2' if appling with an airbrush maybe 20 drops of paint But mainly you put in the reducer first (in mixing cup or the airbrush cup) then the intercoat clear then add the candy O2 basically the same for urethane so you avoid the Candy shock as I have been taught it is call that can make the Candy seed.

    I just did a 15" x 28" mail box side using the CandyO2 Purple to build the image and may have used 20 drops of paint total. not even 1/8 of a 2 oz bottle.
    But some of the parts are light purple and some are a black purple .

    Remeber it is one coupon per person per day so take a lot of friends and family with you when you go :D

    Also can you install a window ac in your garage ? cool it down some , Main thing is how fast the paint will dry and how much tipdry those temps will cause.
    I do use the http://www.coastairbrush.com/proddetail.asp?prod=Professional_Automotive_Reducer&cat=256 reducer when working on metal due to the added acetone in it . but I mask up and have fans set up with filters on them to catch anything .
  8. Neural

    Neural Young Tutorling

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    Unfortunately there are no windows in the garage. Just the main doors and that small vent (which I suspect is there as a regulator requirement due to lack of windows).

    Regarding the reducer: There are are few reducers and such that have been mentioned, but is there a good surface prep for metal to get out any grease or particular matter? I've gotten conflicting information at some points. Some seem to indicate needing a chemical to really clean it out, others have said that with aluminum specifically it doesn't need much preparation at all.

    Also, since I'm going to be looking at keeping cost down, are there any brands I should definitely ignore when it comes to equipment? (I know not to compromise on an airbrush, but am thinking more along the lines of the HPLV that was mentioned, compressors, online stores, etc.)

    And by the way, I really appreciate all the info. I'm currently waiting for delivery on a grinding wheel, so won't be starting anything for a week, but it's exciting to see where the airbrush industry is now after all this time.
  9. Mr.Micron

    Mr.Micron Royal pain in the air hose Admin

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    I scuff the aluminum with a scotch brite pad and wipe with a mild wax and grease remover to make use none of my skin oils are hiding any place but that is all I do .
    I bought a cheap mini hvlp gun for small project for like 14 dollars at a swap meet . Work great on small items like 2x2 panels . mainly it comes down to getting to know your equipment and the climate you live in and how the paint reacts to it all.
  10. Neural

    Neural Young Tutorling

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    I noticed that a number of the HPLV guns were pretty low cost. I wasn't sure if that was a sign of cheap design or if it's just standard for those. Considering that I'm not looking to do much more than wide sweeping sprays to start, that might be a good option. Actually, even if I get something like an Iwata Eclipse (CS?) the HPLV might be useful for applying clear coats.
    Also went to Hobby Lobby today to look around. Good location for the products, but some of them seem priced such that they compensate for the 40% off. The Iwata they were offering was $209, which is quite a bit higher than what I'm seeing online. 2oz. Candy2o paints are $9 for 2oz. also. If buying just one color with the 40% off, that's not real bad, but seems that online might be a better option for packs? Not sure there. Hobby Lobby, at least the one I went to, does not appear to carry Candy2o sets, just individual bottles.
  11. Mr.Micron

    Mr.Micron Royal pain in the air hose Admin

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    Make sure you check the great folks at Coast Airbrush when you searching they also offer airbrush that they used in a class then rebuilt for a discounted price while supplies last that is http://www.coastairbrush.com/proddetail.asp?prod=Iwata_Eclipse_CS_-_Refurbished_Class_Brush
    David and his crew have always treated me right and David is a great wealth of knowledge on all the products he sells . But I use hobby lobby when I need it now other wise I order from David and his Crew .
    We have a few other dealer on this forum as well but it all depends on where someone lives is who we recommend . Being you're in the USA I recommend Coast Airbrush for on line orders.

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