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Clear coating question..

Discussion in 'Beginners Airbrush Questions!' started by ketter89, Mar 16, 2012.


  1. ketter89

    ketter89 Young Tutorling

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    Ok so I won't say I've searched the ENTIRE Forum so far but I haven't noticed any sections referencing some questions and suggestions I have. This may be a lengthy post because it's a BIG subject for me. I'm about to buy my first airbrush soon, I have been heavily draing for about 9 years now so I do have some artistic ability and think Airbrushing would be a good median for me to branch out to, eventually I want to be a tattoo artist. I've been told by my mentor that airbrushing would help me learn techniques that can easily transition into tattooing. Aside from the learning experience, I want to start out by airbrushing on canvas, then move on to clothing, and eventually start airbrushing actual objects i.e. motorcycle helmets, guitars, and anything else i think could use some "modifications" to finally start airbrushing larger things like cars and motorcycles. So I was wondering if you could maybe eventually post some video tutorials on how to airbrush on different medians. My biggest concern is clearcoating and getting that "professional" appearance. I am completely green and inexperienced so if you could please "dumb it up" for me lol. Thanks and keep the videos coming they're helping me feel more confident that I'll be able to advance well in this median.
  2. ketter89

    ketter89 Young Tutorling

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    To elaborate on the clear coating question I had, what I THINK I would have to do is for example if I was using a helmet. I think I would have to sand down the helmet to prep it for the paint, apply whatever design I am wanting to have on it, apply the first layer of clear coat, polish it, and repeat with coats of clear coat and polishing until I've achieved the desired effect. Like i said based off observations I've made, this is what I think this task would require. I also don't know if this means having to use a different type of paint, (especially for airbrushing designs on clothing.) Also, one last thing as far as airbrushing clothing. Is there something I would need to do to keep the paint from fading or smearing in the wash? I've NEVER had any experience in this type of median so I rally don't know anything. Sorry if these questions seem stupid.
  3. ferret

    ferret Needle-chuck Ninja

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    Hi Ketter <Clear coating . I clear coat all the time cars /motorcycles/helmets etc so this is what i do for a helmet . 1: strip Helmet of lining etc and mask . 2: sand shell with 400 dry paper and use a scotch pad to abrade all the edges .3: Prime area with desired primer (i use a water based item ) 4: When dry ,depending on wether using a metallic or flat base colour with determined the paper to use next 500 for metallics 400 for flat base DRY paper 5: spray base colour and in between each operation i also clean with panel wipe and just before spraying i use a tac rag to remove any particles of contamination 6: apply your designs 7: When finished let dry clean with panel wipe and tac rag off7: Now i use a 2k automotive clear of the High Solid variety which i apply with my apollo turbine spray gun .8 I now use a grip coat followed by a full wet coat and once the flash time is reached i apply another full wet coat. 9 With practice you should be able to apply a good gun finish but once cured and cooled down if i need to sand more level or remove dirt particles i use 1200 wet sand to level followed by 1500 until a nice matt fines appears all over and now i apply if needed to achieve finish another full wet coat of clear.10 Once cured i will if needed wet sand again 1500 or 2000 grade to make matt and level and remove ant odd scratches .Then followed by A 3M TRIZAC disc with a little water on my 3" DA with a backing pad to remove all the other scratches from the coarser grades of paper . 11 Once matt all over with the finer abrasives i then machine compound using a newer generation compound that gets finer in its abrasion as you work it .This you do until your desired finish appears like glass . 12 Clean up and give a final polish from your desired brand .
    Please note all the above will have variations in use dependant on brands you choose to use for example the recommendations for machine compounding do vary a lot and clearcoats do vary in there mix rates and application recommendations /thinning/ mix ratios and drying times etc .I use mipa cx1 at the moment 3 to 1 mix + 10% thinner if needed flash time 7 mins before bake infa red dry 8 mins let cool and can sand and polish after 30 mins . hope this helps

  4. Fire Brush

    Fire Brush Young Tutorling

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    Hi Keter89 < regarding clothing paints. Just as there are specialty paints for auto, etc., there are specialty paints for fabric that can make your life easier and the end result will be brilliant colors that don't fade or wash out. The most important thing about painting fabric is to match your paint to the fabric you are painting. The paints that are designed for 100% cotton will not work well on poly/cotton; and will fail on wool or silk. Before you start painting fabric, research all you can on fabric paints. My favorite source in the whole world for anything fabric related is Dharma Trading Co. in the U.S. (In California, USA). Google them. The ROCK when it comes to materials, fabrics, ready to paint clothing, and all paints and dyes. And they're very cool to deal with (i.e. very helpful!).
  5. drobbins12

    drobbins12 Spider Splatterer

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    Ketter

    Ketter,

    I don't doubt you are artistic and I'm sure that your drawing experience will definitely help you in airbrushing. My dad is a very good artist and he struggled with the airbrush when he tried it for the first time. That being said, Mitch has a lot of great practice sheets to hone your techniques. I am a brand new airbrusher as well, and from my experience so far, there is a lot of "touch" required when using the airbrush. But you are going to enjoy it when you get into it. It's alot of fun.
  6. ketter89

    ketter89 Young Tutorling

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    BAM! There is a prim example as to why i LOVE this forum. There's no way I would have known that because I wouldn't have thought about it until i had already tried (and most likely failed) a few times lmao. Thanks Fire Brush I'll check DTC good call man.
  7. ketter89

    ketter89 Young Tutorling

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    drobbins12, Don't get me wrong, I'm sure it will be several months before I actually start producing work that fits my standards. Airbrushing to me is just going to be my next major challenge. I feel there's a better future for my son and I if I pursue airbrushing as I have drawing. I love art with every ounce of my soul. However, I've never been the kind of artist that is interested in paintbrushes or sculpting or any medians like that. I admire those medians but things like airbrushing and tattooing, now THERES where I feel at home. I'm a little less than a month away from having my first airbrush and I can't wait to start!
  8. Fire Brush

    Fire Brush Young Tutorling

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    Glad to help! :)
  9. DreadfulEpiphany

    DreadfulEpiphany Young Tutorling

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    Airbrushing vs. tattooing is like skateboarding vs. surfing. They're similar, but opposites as well. For example: From what I've seen in airbrushing (I'm a novice myself) it's best to start from light colors to dark colors (because it's so easy to get "milky" results) but in tattooing it tends to be the complete opposite (because since the skin is open it's easily susceptible to staining whenever you wipe).

    Edit: That being said, they're no real "wrong" way to do anything. If what you're doing works for you, then more power to you. I'm just saying in general.
    :]
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2012

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