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Anyone know a fix for this issue ?

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting!' started by ImCOnfused111, Jan 3, 2016.


  1. ImCOnfused111

    ImCOnfused111 Young Tutorling

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    Here's a video ( not my video ) of the exact problem I'm having with my badger patriot 105 It's thoroughly cleaned so that's not the issue. What could it be ?
  2. ImCOnfused111

    ImCOnfused111 Young Tutorling

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    Thanks in advance for any help I might get.
  3. jagardn

    jagardn Airbrush Acquisition Disorder Patient Elite Member!

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    It looks familiar, but I just can't place it...

    [​IMG]
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  4. jagardn

    jagardn Airbrush Acquisition Disorder Patient Elite Member!

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    Haha! It looks like there is a bad seal where the nozzle meets the airbrush body. If here is some paint or debris between the body and the tail end of the nozzle, it could allow paint into the air cap and cause something like that.
  5. ImCOnfused111

    ImCOnfused111 Young Tutorling

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    I've ripped the whole airbrush apart and thoroughly cleaned it. Not a drop of nothing anywhere on the brush. If it's not debris would it mean it's a defect in the airbrush? Would it b time to contact badger or is there something I can do to fix it ?
  6. Amra

    Amra Needle-chuck Ninja

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    Have you tried teflon tape on the nozzle cap threads and aircap threads? Also, on that video you linked a couple responses say that it can be caused by low PSI, what are you spraying at?

    You Tube Video
  7. haasje dutchairbrush

    haasje dutchairbrush Air-Valve Autobot! Very Likeable!

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    Looks like the threads from the head parts don't seal 100%. Unless you lose a lot of pressure or see this also happen with paint (which is thicker than water) it shouldn't be a problem. If you find it anoying or it negatively influences airflow put a bit of wax on the threads of the parts of the heas assembly (or maybe juts tighten m a bit if thats possible, but don't force that)
  8. Oddball

    Oddball Detail Decepticon!

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    That is definitely a seal (seating) defect and as Haaje says, I little bee's wax (not a lot) on the threads will / should sort it out.
    You need to be careful not to use too much wax because if the head is held away from the main body it can affect the air flow and spray cone will be affected.
  9. RebelAir

    RebelAir Air-Valve Autobot!

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    Its just what happens to many brushes, the threads are a little worn, likely just from pulling it apart and putting it together over time..Don't use teflon tape...never use teflon tape.(makes it easy to cross thread your brush and if not sure what your doing with it can wreck a perfectly good brush)..but you can use beeswax as mentioned or a little vaseline..it will help a bit..I do what most would say to not do but think its mentioned above..just nip it up slightly past finger tight and you will find the issue will like dissapear, if not try some vaseline, chapstick or beeswax if you have a source of either and then see if that fully stops it..But if it doesn't affect the brush action or cause skipping issues and the like, leave it be :) On the vid it appears the nozzle just isnt tight enough, is it your nozzle or the actual head assembly leaking?
  10. Amra

    Amra Needle-chuck Ninja

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    Well, there you go. I stand corrected. I've never cross threaded anything with teflon tape, but I see the potential if you put too much on. These people know what they are talking about, so if they say beeswax is a better option, then beeswax is a better option. :thumbsup:
  11. RebelAir

    RebelAir Air-Valve Autobot!

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    Sorry amra, didnt mean to correct your thoughts, it is something many suggest and isn't a bad idea when one knows what they are doing but most don't know how to actually put teflon tape on correctly (It does have to go on a specific direction) and often in industry it isn't used at all except on larger threads that may need a seal-realistically 9/10 times its a plumbing thing and thats funny as a lot of plumbing threads are taper sealed or face sealed and it shouldnt need any tape either..often on smaller threads you will see that theres not enough thread and if not super tight it may not grab the teflon tape and it allows then the tape to push up the thread, it will seal as it creates an oring type effect but it also puts a lot of lateral force on the thread itself, stretching the thread, which may not lead to immediate failure but over time will create a weakness wear the thread meets the head assembly body and can cause minute cracks that may lead to later failure of the thread....Often in industry on the smaller threads we use a non-hardening loctite if an airtight seal is needed and no other option exists, beeswax and such is just a safer alternative to the loctite as well, even a light smear of candle wax will do the same job, so many ways to skin that cat-So didnt mean to say you can't use it but something you should be really careful using if you do especially when there are options that are so much safer....
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  12. Amra

    Amra Needle-chuck Ninja

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    Please, don't be sorry! I have been out of the loop for somewhere around 15 years, so I am re-learning as I go. A lot has changed since I was younger.

    You're absolutely right about the learning curve for teflon tape, those issues were things you just accepted back in the day, but once you got the hang of it, it was second nature. There werent a whole lot of options back then, and there weren't as many resources where such amazing artists could come together and share their knowledge, so you just used what worked and was readily available. Im sure the old masters knew all these tricks back then, but we teenagers didn't. :laugh:

    In fact, I absolutely agree with you. Given the two options, beeswax seems to be the better option as it accomplishes the same task with less potential for mistakes. A better option is a better option, and I am not so old that I would stubbornly use the same method I always used out of tradition or spite. :)
  13. Madbrush

    Madbrush Guest

    I can imagine that bees wax might be better than Teflon tape but to be honest I never used either except some Teflon on the threads of the air valve on a cheapie I had when I first started, my general theory is that if these items weren't in or on the brush when bought it then they're not meant to be there at all, I'm not bothered about cheapies but I now have three Iwatas, one was a present, one was second hand and the other I saved hard to get it, Iwata parts as you probably know are pretty expensive so damage through negligent handling could not only be costly but would also devoid any warranty our tools ever had, since I've heard stories of iwata service replacing even ten year old brushes they couldn't fix I personally don't take chances in case I ever have to exploit that avenue.

    I couldn't say for sure that Teflon tape would or could damage threads since I've never seen it happen but again because the threads at the head are so small I don't dare to chance it, I'm even always super careful when I have to strip down when I get to the head.

    Everyone has their own little tips and tricks and stuff to get around all kinds of problems and 99% of the time they work but someone just starting who's never handled a brush before could do a lot of damage simply by doing the right thing the wrong way, if a new brush doesn't behave as it should out of the box or displays problems I always recommend sending it back and do nothing to it at all other than the normal cleaning processes.
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 3, 2016
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  14. Amra

    Amra Needle-chuck Ninja

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    These two quoted lines are pretty important.

    Though, its important to realize that helical threads have an inherent design flaw, in that even when properly tightened, there is a minute path/tunnel which travels the length of the threads. This is really unavoidable. Some companies minimize the effects of this by increasing thread counts to make the path smaller, or adding an oring/rubber bushing, using teflon tape, using pipedope, etc to fill/block/clog the path. Some methods work better than others for certain applications, and in the case of airbrushes the small thread pitch makes the problem pretty negligible in most cases (the amount of air traveling up the threads is insignificant compared to the air coming out the tip). However, parts wear over time and the wax/teflon tape is really only meant to fill in the area that gets worn over time and widens that minute path/tunnel.

    That said; you're right that someone probably shouldn't be needing beeswax or teflon tape on a brand new airbrush and if they are having problems they should consider contacting the manufacturer who can help them troubleshoot the issue more effectively and provide better solutions (or replacement if necessary).
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  15. ImCOnfused111

    ImCOnfused111 Young Tutorling

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    Thanks for all the help guys. I'm using different createx auto air paints and running the recommended psi for each. I'm pretty sure it's a defect in the equipment and not the user (this time) I'm gonna try the beeswax or Vaseline and if that don't help I'll definitely b calling badger. The brush is about 2 weeks old and only ran mayb 12oz of paint through it so far so it should b working perfectly.
  16. Mr.Micron

    Mr.Micron Royal pain in the air hose Admin

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    Simple bees wax on the thread will seal it . teflon tape can cause too many issues you do not want.
    Heat up bees wax stick , dap just a bit on it and screw it back together .
  17. markjthomson

    markjthomson AKA QuickDraw and very happy #nobrushleftbehind Staff Member Mod

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    Beeswax is good - chapstick also works very nicely... I did that mod on my eclipse the other day - very happy with the result.

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