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Badger Krome Vs. Iwata Micron Cm-C+

Discussion in 'Airbrushes' started by Mr.Micron, Apr 11, 2013.


  1. airbrushingferret

    airbrushingferret Air-Valve Autobot!

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    iv been experimenting with a dremmel polishing pad and compound and i found that a quick polissh while spinning the needle seems to help and im interested in trying it with a brand new needle im also thinking of experimenting with a .15 needle and my spare fluid head i,m wonndering if a micron out does the infinity with no problem even though tneedle is huge in comparison how would it work with a much finer nozzle and needle Thain again theirs a limit to how fine you can go unless your interested in in painting realistic dust bunnies lol
  2. HCP-draggin

    HCP-draggin Guest

    Try to find Eddy's article on airbrush tuning. If I remember right, it was in the now-defunct Airbrush Digest. It's bound to be available somewhere on the web, though. Even using the relatively simple ideas he puts forward in that article, you can tune nearly any airbrush to optimum levels. Microns, especially, respond well to the tweaks he talks about. Polishing the needle will make a significant difference in itself, but you can go beyond that to re-profiling the needle, polishing the nozzle, inside of the air cap, etc. Using a .15 needle in a micron won't offer any significant advantage. For one, the size of the needle doesn't play much of a role in the fine-detailing ability. Not when the difference in nozzle size is only 0.03, anyway. I've found that the Iwata needles are better quality than the Infinity needles, anyway. But, experimenting is half the fun, anyway, isn't it? There used to be companies that made nozzles as fine as 0.1 (Aerograph, if I remember right). They were mostly used with dye-based inks for photo re-touching. There just weren't many paints you could actually get to spray through them.
  3. airbrushingferret

    airbrushingferret Air-Valve Autobot!

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    maybe etac efx i dont even reducwe it i like it straight lol nice dark lines yes i am having fun tweeking my guns i spend alot of time tweeking and cleaning i now have all 4 working properly with perfect needles i can spin them and it looks like there stationary oso i have a micron elocity infinity and krome il keep thwem all just dont touch theinfinity needle lol
  4. Ramon Gibbs

    Ramon Gibbs Guest

    I've not owned a micron before. I just couldn't see paying the price. And maintenance/repair parts seem more than two or three of my airbrushes. There's a number of alternatives to the Iwata micron and it's price. Paasche Vision, Badger krome and sotar, and Olympos micron.
    And I've found favorable results with each of them. But I would've been really upset to have purchased an Iwata micron only to find spending all that money REALLY wasn't needed, or perhaps be in denial like a few others.
  5. Shellintons

    Shellintons Guest

    I was going to go for a Krome but ended up with a velocity after playing with the badger range. I have wondered about the Iwatas though so it was great to read your comparison. Thanks
  6. Ramon Gibbs

    Ramon Gibbs Guest

    Like the pros have stated so many times, practice is essential with an airbrush you put in your hand. Things like the point of trigger pull back when paint begins. Learning paint consistency vs psi. Dagger stroks, etc. For me, I purchased 1/4 inch and 1/8 inch gragh paper and practice making smily faces. This allows me to learn the potential of different airbrushes I have, paint thinning and more.
    I was 1/8 inch gragh paper with my finer detail airbrushs and 1/4 inch for airbrushes with need

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