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Dual action trigger pull weight

Discussion in 'How to Control an Airbrush' started by Neural, Jun 19, 2018.


  1. Neural

    Neural Gravity Guru

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    Not sure if this is specific to the Paasche design of their airbrushes, but the two parts that sit behind the trigger consist of one part that the trigger pushes against (the needle passes through this, and the needle chuck(?) screws onto the end of it to tighten/hold the needle). Around that, is the spring assembly that is threaded into the front part of the body.

    What I'm unsure of is how far that spring assembly needs to be screwed in, and what sort of pressure I should expect to need to pull with my index finger in order to use the airbrush while having enough spring pressure to push the trigger forward, yet also not wind up with muscle fatigue.

    Sometimes I feel like I'm lacking control because I get this sort of sudden burst of motion when I start to pull back on the trigger. Like it's got a threshold of pressure required for it to start pulling back, but then when it reaches that threshold, the trigger is pulled back *too* far.

    This makes dagger strokes a bit more like... candle stick strokes or something.

    Also, if anyone has any experience with both the Paasche Talon, and the Iwata Eclipse HP-CS, I'd love to know if there's a substantial difference on the trigger action. Will add it to my "reasons you were stupid to buy a Talon" list while I save up to buy an Eclipse.
  2. Jimmyfingerz

    Jimmyfingerz Elite Member! Elite Member! Very Likeable!

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    For me I found it very fatiguing when I first started so loosened the tension on my iwata hp-c quite a bit.
    I use the cm-sb which i’ve been using a few months now and find I have to have it quite tight, almost all the way in but I don’t find it fatiguing at all.
    Maybe I have started to build my trigger finger so I get less fatigue, i’m not sure.
    I’m pretty sure you set it to how you feel comfortable without affecting the brush performance, not sure if I read that or watched a video on it somewhere.
    Also trigger control just comes with practice, I was useless to start with but control the cm-sb really well now considering I’ve only been airbrushing for around 6 months.
    Just stick at it and you’ll be controlling it easy in no time.
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  3. Dimitris

    Dimitris Mac-Valve Maestro! Very Likeable!

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    Hey Neural. Just screw the spring guide till the end. that's the point where a very slight pull of the trigger will immediately pull the needle and spray. As much as you unscrew the spring guide, the softer that response will be. Hope I explained it right.
  4. MarcosD

    MarcosD Mac-Valve Maestro!

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    yup the Talon trigger is a pain in the a.., but when you tuned it right and get use to it, you will be more precise in your lines. I’ve got both Talon and HP-CS, and yes there are difference in construction materials and qualities, but when I tuned the Talon works as good as the hp-cs. I had lubricated the Talon trigger with silicon grease and sanded a bit the side of it as it was touching the main body and make it a little rough and now works fine, and also unscrew the part you mentioned to losen the spring as much as I could.
    Hth


    Enviado desde mi iPad utilizando Tapatalk
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  5. Tocean

    Tocean Needle-chuck Ninja Very Likeable!

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    I've been trying to see if I can control the action better.

    One thing i found I do sometimes is tense my grip to much, this leads to fatigue and less control, I've tried to relax a bit more with it, also when spraying I stop and stretch out the fingers, thumbs and wrists.
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  6. Leakyvalve

    Leakyvalve Mac-Valve Maestro!

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    Death grip is real and it usually peaks when doing super small details and you can't afford any bobble or wiggle. I take alot of breaks because of it.
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  7. crewchief227

    crewchief227 Gravity Guru

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    I know this is kinda old, but wanted to chime in on the subject. I too use an CM-SB for my primary (my secondary a CM-C+), and at first would have the spring adjustment set rather soft, but now when I reassemble I know to set it between 2-3 rows of threads showing. It's harder to set a HP-CS cause the screw is internal, and you have to screw in so far to get the handle on all the way. Anyways, the reason I went to a stiffer spring was not just over control, but also because too soft a spring and the needle won't reseat all the way leading to more clogging and tip dry issues. That slow almost invisible tip dry. So when I teach I tell my students to set it at first to what they can tolerate without getting trigger finger fatigue. As you airbrush more and more you build up your trigger finger strength and control. So my brushes may feel stiff to someone else, but just right for me. Lol
  8. Nessus

    Nessus Gravity Guru

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    I had gone through a period with my brushes previously where I dialed the spring as light as possible. With the SOTAR this meant pointing the brush straight up, and dialing back it 'till the trigger would start to fall backward under it's own weight, then slowly dialing if forward again juuuust until the trigger reached the forward most position. With the Eclipse I had to swap the spring with a pen spring. In both cases I found that the trigger moved too easily, forcing me to actively use opposing muscle groups just to keep the trigger in a given spot, or to move it with any precision. So I ended up settling for a vague "somewhere in the middle" tension.

    Recently I've been dialing it up pretty tight on all my brushes. Reason was, when I got my Micron about a month ago, I discovered it was noticeably easier to control in fine increments the tighter the trigger was. This effect wasn't noticeable on my Eclipse or SOTAR, but it was super apparent on the Micron. I've since redialed my Eclipse all the way up too. I tried dialing the SOTAR all the way up, but with that brush it's actually possible to make it WAY too heavy to use, so I settled at somewhere in the vicinity of 3/4 of the way to full tightness.
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  9. crewchief227

    crewchief227 Gravity Guru

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    On my Microns I set the main spring so that their is 2 threads showing. On my CS & CH these are a little more difficult as they have the interior threading, so I screw them in just until I can get the handle to seat fully, and the cut outs are facing north south, instead of how they are pictured most the time as I find they like to rub me the wrong way on my trigger finger.
  10. Nessus

    Nessus Gravity Guru

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    Yeah, I feel like handle cutouts are often shown oriented incorrectly in product photos B/C they want them to look all prettily symmetrical, and that leads to a lot of people getting the (IMO incorrect) impression they that's how they're supposed to be in use. In my experience the "correct" practical orientation is diagonally so your hand or finger always rests right on one of the spans instead of half in one of the cutouts.

    Same with prong aircaps. The product photos would have you believe they should be oriented straight vertical, but IMO they're best oriented diagonally so your view of the needle is directly between the forks.
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  11. crewchief227

    crewchief227 Gravity Guru

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    Exactly. I was almost thinking about putting a CM-SB handle without the pre set knob because my SB is so much more comfortable. And at the 4 o'clock position on my CM-SB handle it's brassed up, showing exactly where my finger lands. :D

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