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Varnish cover on large stretch canvas

Discussion in 'Beginners Airbrush Questions!' started by V-Twin, Apr 14, 2019 at 12:56 AM.


  1. V-Twin

    V-Twin Mac-Valve Maestro! Very Likeable!

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    I am nearly ready to start doing a painting on a large canvas (100cm long x 80cm high) for a local business.
    I will be using Com-Art paints, and at the end I wish to varnish it to protect it.

    I have Com-Art's own Gloss varnish (but actually looks Satin when dried) and have used this on my other much smaller paintings with my largest needle, a 0.4mm H&S.

    My question really is, what is the best way to varnish this large canvas, ie: using my 0.4mm airbrush and the Com-Art varnish OR buy a Rattle Can varnish (Windsor & Newton, Liquitex etc), or buy a cheap big gun, something like those HPLV things mentions on here, bearing in mind my compressor is a Bambi BB24V (24ltr tank).

    Just asking as I think using my normal H&S 0.4mm brush and needle would take quite some time to cover
    such a large area, not to mention trying to get good even coverage and that I really, really need to have a good
    standard of finish as this is a 'commissioned' job and my first one to boot.

    thanks
  2. SiRoxx

    SiRoxx Party Boy UK Style Very Likeable!

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    Hello Mate, long time no see! Glad to see you’re busy painting. Have you thought about using a hairy brush to cover the area. I’ve never tried it, but here’s a pretty good video to help consider the option.
  3. Airbrush Dreams

    Airbrush Dreams Air-Valve Autobot! Very Likeable!

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  4. wickedartstudio

    wickedartstudio Mac-Valve Maestro!

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    I use a traditional "hairy" brush, but use a good quality brush. You don't want to leave shedding hairs from the brush in your final finish.
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  5. V-Twin

    V-Twin Mac-Valve Maestro! Very Likeable!

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    @SiRoxx , Hello and yea, not touched any paint for some months now as I hit a very low point a few days before Christmas.
    I think I have come through it and now trying to get the paint mojo going again. Many thanks for the video, interesting info
    there and differing implements to lay the stuff down.

    @Airbrush Dreams Fred, checked out the Krylon you stated, and so a rattle can wold be ok for good even coatings?
    I was worried about spitting from the nozzle and not a perfectly fine and constant mist spray.

    @wickedartstudio I was thinking briefly of a brush but thought it would leave trails/brush marks, thus didn't think it would
    be viable. Obviously I am wrong on that :whistling:. Guess it is all down to the quality of the brush hairs as you suggest.

    I was not sure whether buying a rattle can from Halfords (Automotive store) would be the correct idea or stuff, or to buy
    'proper' varnish from either Liquitex or Windsor & Newton. My main thought was of using a HVLP gun (cheap one),
    as this would ensure nice even coverage. I found some info on a photographer who inkjets pics onto canvas and rag,
    and switched from brushing/rolling to using a 'Wagner Flexico 590' kit to get his 'giclee' finish.

    many thanks for info all, very much appreciated.
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  6. wickedartstudio

    wickedartstudio Mac-Valve Maestro!

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    A traditional "hairy" brush can leave brush stokes in your final finish if you work it on slower (depending on the conditions you're working in). If you work the final varnish a little faster it will level out nicely and won't leave brush strokes in the final finish in my experience. Adding more than one coat of varnish can change the effect dramatically. Personally, I kind of like the look of brush strokes in the final varnish, it keeps people guessing as to how you achieved the final result (was it airbrush,hairy brush or a combination). Play with it on a test panel (varnish isn't all that expensive to play with) and find what works for you.
    SiRoxx likes this.

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